Canada, B.C. collaboration improves career opportunities for young adults

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More than 3,000 people between 16 and 29 in B.C. will benefit during the next two years from skills training and employment as part of a collaborative effort of the governments of British Columbia and Canada.

“Young people are the future and we need to ensure they have access to the skills training for Canada’s growing economy,” said Randy Boissonnault, federal Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Official Languages. “This funding is just one component of our work with the Government of British Columbia to provide training, education and opportunity to anyone entering the workforce, and connect thousands of young people across B.C. with new job opportunities and career growth.”

The Young Adults and Young Adults at Risk programs provide skills training and employment supports, which are based on the needs of each participant, to help overcome barriers to employment and give young people skills needed to succeed in the workplace and beyond.

“People are British Columbia’s greatest strength and we’re taking action to ensure that all British Columbians can reach their full potential,” said Selina Robinson, B.C.’s Minister of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills. “With this funding from the Government of Canada, we’re removing barriers and making sure young people can access relevant training to get in-demand careers that are rewarding, meaningful and build a stronger B.C. that leaves no one behind.”

Participants in the Young Adults program acquire new skills and get help with barriers they face, including lack of job-related skills, work experience, suitable clothing, transportation and child care requirements that may be holding them back. These participants are typically motivated and employment-ready, but happen to be unemployed or want positions with more job security.

The Young Adults At Risk program has a similar focus. It differs in that participants are not considered to be employment-ready due to complex barriers, such as housing instability, criminal records, incomplete high school education, addiction recovery or mental-health challenges.

These confidence-building programs for young people offer a wide variety of opportunities to learn new skills and train for careers in areas such as early childhood education assistants, work-camp kitchen cooks and caterers, or boat and marine-service technicians. Young people seeking greater job security can boost their skills to match new jobs and high-opportunity careers in growing sectors, while public, private and non-profit employers find the skilled workers they need.

“I have learned so much about the child care industry – health and safety, communication techniques, professionalism – from our workshops and collaborative efforts with my peers,” said Jermaine Romano, who has experienced the benefits of these programs. “Just as important, I have learned about myself. I have gained self-awareness and a clear understanding on what I value in life, both personally and professionally, which I could not say before my participation in the early childhood education assistant training program.”

This program is funded by a $15-million commitment for the young-adult programs in fiscal 2023-24, provided by the Government of Canada through the Canada-British Columbia Workforce Development Agreement (WDA). The WDA provides gainful opportunities for workers and helps employers find the people they need to drive B.C.’s economy forward.

Learn More:

Visit Skills Training for Employment Program for more information about the Young Adults and the Young Adults at Risk streams:

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